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  • Management of Women with Mental Health Issues during Pregnancy and the Postnatal Period (Good Practice No. 14)

    ...and address decisions on medication management in late pregnancy, the immediate postpartum period and with regard to breastfeeding. ● A locally agreed protocol should be in place with child safeguarding services allowing for their involvement where...

    Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 09 June 2011

  • Cardiac Disease and Pregnancy (Good Practice No. 13)

    ...starting contraception before your fertility returns. This may be as early as four weeks after delivery if you are not fully breastfeeding. And finally... Don’t forget that if you decide to get pregnant, taking extra folic acid (easily obtainable...

    Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 22 June 2011

  • Evidence Can Influence Clinical Practice, How (Scientific Impact Paper 28)

    ...do guidelines become outdated? JAMA 2001;286:1461–7. 12. Brodribb W. Barriers to translating evidence-based breastfeeding information into practice. Acta Paediatr 2011;100:486–90. 13. Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Safer...

    Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 28 September 2011

  • Making normal birth a reality

    ...agreement and without jeopardising safety, this should be the objective. A straightforward birth makes it easier to establish breastfeeding, helps get family life off to a good start, and protects long-term health. We have developed the following practical...

    Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 26 November 2007

  • Home Births - RCOG and RCM joint statement number 2

    ...The improved relationships built upon continuity of care and carer can lead to considerable advantages in the promotion of breastfeeding, reduction in smoking in pregnancy and improved nutrition for women. 5.3 Continuity of care is a complex concept as...

    Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 08 June 2007

  • HIV and pregnancy: information for you

    ...treatment with anti-retroviral drugs (see below) • avoid breastfeeding and choose to bottle-feed your baby with formula milk...at 12 weeks. If these tests are negative and you are not breastfeeding, your baby does not have HIV. A further test to confirm...

    Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 13 December 2013

  • Group B streptococcus (GBS) infection in newborn babies - information for you

    ...breastfeed? It is safe to breastfeed your new baby. Breastfeeding has not been shown to increase the risk of GBS infection...or she should be treated promptly with antibiotics. • Breastfeeding does not increase the risk of GBS infection and will protect...

    Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 21 June 2013

  • Why your weight matters during pregnancy and after birth: information for you

    ...once a year. Information and support about breastfeeding Breastfeeding is best for your baby. It is possible to breastfeed...to take vitamin D supplements whilst you are breastfeeding. Healthy eating and exercise Continue to...

    Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 30 November 2011

  • Audit Recipe Book (3rd edition) 2012

    ...pregnancy, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation of pregnant women. ◗◗ For all women with a live infant facilities for breastfeeding (or use of breast pump) should be available. Retrospective or prospective data collection over one month ...

    Royal College of Anaesthetists, 08 January 2014

  • Gestational diabetes - information for you

    ...monitored. 4 What happens after my baby is born? • Your baby will stay with you unless he or she needs extra care. • Breastfeeding is best for babies, and there’s no reason why you shouldn’t breastfeed your baby if you have gestational diabetes. Whichever...

    Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, 04 March 2013

Results 21 - 30 (of 35)
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