Tracheal gas insufflation for the prevention of morbidity and mortality in mechanically ventilated newborn infants

Source:
NICE Quality and Productivity Case Studies
Publisher:
Queen's University Belfast
Publication date:
31 October 2011

Abstract

NICE summary of review conclusions

Tracheal gas insufflation for the prevention of morbidity and mortality in mechanically ventilated newborn infants is not supported by sufficient good quality evidence. Consideration could be given to using it only within the context of a research or audit project.

Reducing or stopping tracheal gas insufflation for the prevention of morbidity and mortality in mechanically ventilated newborn infants, outside of a research context, is currently likely to improve the quality of patient care in the NHS and result in productivity savings by reducing the use of unproven therapies.

The Implications for practice section of the Cochrane review stated:

There is evidence from a single small randomised controlled trial that tracheal gas insufflation may reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation in preterm infants – although the data from this single small study does not give sufficient evidence to support the introduction of tracheal gas insufflation into clinical practice. The technical requirements for performing tracheal gas insufflation (as performed in the single included study) are great, and there is no statistically significant reduction in the total duration of respiratory support or hospital stay. Tracheal gas insufflation cannot be recommended for general use at this time.