Continuous passive motion following total knee arthroplasty in people with arthritis

Source:
NICE Quality and Productivity Case Studies
Publisher:
Queen's University Belfast
Publication date:
07 August 2016

Abstract

NICE summary of Cochrane review conclusions

Evidence shows that continuous passive motion following total knee arthroplasty in people with arthritis is not effective and should not be used. Reducing or stopping continuous passive motion following total knee arthroplasty in people with arthritis will reduce the use of ineffective treatments and may be of value in terms of productivity savings although this is difficult to quantify.

The Implications for practice section of the Cochrane review stated:

‘The effects of continuous passive motion (CPM) on range of motion (ROM), pain, function and quality of life are too small to justify its use and costs but the effects of CPM on participants’ global assessment of treatment effectiveness are unclear. This review provides very low-quality evidence that CPM reduces the risk of manipulation under anaesthesia; however, these findings need to be interpreted with caution because they are inconsistent with the moderate-quality evidence indicating that CPM has no effect on knee ROM even though the main indication for manipulation under anaesthesia is joint stiffness.’