Drug treatments for Parkinson's

Source:
Parkinson's UK
Publisher:
Parkinson's UK
Publication date:
30 November 2015

Abstract

Drug treatment is the main method used to control the symptoms of Parkinson's.   Parkinson's symptoms happen when levels of a chemical messenger in your brain, called dopamine, become too low.   Drug treatments aim to increase the level of dopamine that reaches the brain and stimulate the parts of the brain where dopamine works.   Current medications can help to manage Parkinson's symptoms, but we don’t yet have any treatments that can cure, slow, stop or reverse the progression of Parkinson’s. This means the condition continues to progress as do the symptoms and side effects of taking more medication.

Keywords: Amantadine;Anxiety;Apomorphine;Behaviour;Behaviour change;Brain;Bromocriptine;Cabergoline;Capsules;Carbidopa;Cells;Chemicals;Cholinergic antagonists;Co-beneldopa;Co-careldopa;Compulsive behaviour;Constipation;Depression;Dopamine;Dopamine agonists;Drug;Drug treatments;Dying;Dyskinesias;Emotions;Entacapone;Glutamates;Health professionals;Healthcare professionals;Hospitals;Information and communications technology;Injections;Levodopa;Medication;Medicines management;Movement;Nurses;Parkinson's disease;Pergolide;Pharmaceutical preparations;Pharmacists;Pramipexole;Prescribing;Procyclidine;Rasagiline;Research methods;Rights;Ropinirole;Rotigotine;Selegiline;Social exclusion;Tablets;Therapeutics;Tolcapone;Volition;Vulnerable groups;Work;World health organization