Reducing hospital admission rates for people with diabetes: a systematic approach to improving primary care outcomes

Source:
NICE Quality and Productivity Case Studies
Publisher:
NHS Greenwich
Publication date:
15 January 2013

Abstract

 

In 2008, people with diabetes living in Greenwich had some of the poorest outcomes in the country as measured through Quality Outcomes Framework (QOF) achievement rates. Only 53.7% of patients with diabetes had an HbA 1c <7.5% (DM20), which was in the bottom 1% of PCTs. 76.7% of patients with diabetes had a cholesterol level of <5 mmol/L (DM17), which was also in the bottom 1% of PCTs. 76.9% of patients with diabetes had a blood pressure of <145/85 mmHg (DM12), which was in the bottom 14% of PCTs. As a result, a new initiative was launched to develop a more systematic approach to secondary prevention in primary care. As part of this initiative NHS Greenwich joined a partnership with MSD (UK subsidiary of Merck) to deliver improvements using the established EVIDENCE into PRACTICETM programme, which provided assisted, structured cardio-metabolic risk management and supported sharing of best practice and continuing professional development. This programme ‘aims to ensure that people with diabetes and those at increased cardio-metabolic risk receive optimal care through the effective implementation of national policy and guidelines, particularly NICE Type 2 Diabetes Guidelines’ (NICE 2009, see contacts and resources).The programme was designed to improve health outcomes of people with diabetes through the implementation of national and/or local guidelines. An additional aim is to ensure that the practices are self sustaining in the future.