Medicines Evidence Commentary : Respiratory tract infections: UK study finds prescribing feedback and decision support tools reduced antibiotic prescribing in primary care

Source:
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence - NICE
Publisher:
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)
Publication date:
15 April 2019

Abstract

A UK cluster randomised controlled trial found that a computer-based antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) intervention that provided brief training, prescribing feedback and decision support tools reduced antibiotic prescribing for self-limiting respiratory tract infections, and did not increase complication rates. GP practices who received the AMS intervention prescribed 98.7 antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory tract infections per 1,000 person years, compared with 107.6 antibiotic prescriptions in the control practices. Antibiotic prescribing was reduced most in people aged 15 to 84 years, with 1 antibiotic prescription per year being avoided for every 62 patients in this age range registered in a GP practice. This new study is an example of how feedback and education can be delivered across a wide area to support the national antimicrobial stewardship agenda, as discussed in the NICE guideline on systems and processes for effective antimicrobial medicine use.

This link will take you to the medicines evidence commentary featured in the NICE Medicines Awareness Weekly. Medicines evidence commentaries help contextualise important new evidence, highlighting areas that could signal a change in clinical practice. It does not constitute formal NICE guidance.